PLANS FOR 2018 BOOK?
Posted: 05 April 2017 07:46 AM   [ Ignore ]
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It seems to have gone very quiet on the plans for the future direction of the book, are there any firm plans yet?. Regards Don.

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Posted: 19 April 2017 01:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Or ANYKIND of plans with the “old good” PRINT media..?

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Posted: 19 April 2017 06:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Sorry - I could have sworn that I responded to Don’s original post. Evidently not.

We don’t have much to add to the announcement we made last summer. All being well there will be two new books published this autumn, covering two Alpine countries, and of course we’ll be releasing details in due course.

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Posted: 19 April 2017 07:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Thanks Chris, look forward to that.

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Posted: 29 April 2017 10:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I am also excited that the book is coming back grin
Now let’s speculate which two alpine countries it could be. One should be France obviously as the by far most attractive country for Britons. The second is kinda hard to guess. Switzerland basically is only geographically suited for Britons, but in my opinion offers not as good skiing as Italy and Austria. But for Italy I always felt that it basically is divided in two, first the areas close to France (Aosta valley, Vialattea, Mondole etc.), secondly the areas close to Austria (the entire Dolomites/South Tyrol). There are also some smaller areas close to Slovenia (Friuli-Venezia Giulia) and Switzerland (Livigno and arguably Alagna).

Because you know, last year in Germany after a drought there two new Ski Atlases published, but they were not nearly as good as the ones we had up until 2013 and not even close to WTSS. The best thing about WTSS in my opinion is, that opposed to the German Ski Atlases, the authors really were in all or most of the areas described, which I find particularly useful to know things you probably don’t know without being there - for example, that the Sarenne in Alpe d’Huez is groomed (because in France most black pistes are not groomed), or whether certain pistes and links are easy/difficult, take a lot of time etc. - for example, that the link from Claviere to Sansicario takes quite some time. Or when and where there are typically queues.

I kinda wish that WTSS were there in German too :D. (For me the english version is fine, but many people don’t buy foreign books.)

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Posted: 25 May 2017 10:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Hi - sorry about v slow response.

The books planned for publication this year are Austria and Italy. It doesn’t always make sense to take the obvious course ...

Glad you prefer our brand of informed analysis rather than the traditional German atlas approach, which is to build a catalogue of detail that can be obtained from the resort website.

We have in the past tried to get WTSS publshed in German. Maybe we’ll have more success with a guide to Austria alone.

Chris

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Posted: 27 May 2017 01:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Ah, okay grin
Then there are possibly more chapters for resorts which were featured in WTSS only in the Resort directory with short descriptions? That would be great!

For Germany, indeed Austria (plus South Tyrol) is by far the most popular ski destination. Many Germans don’t ever ski somewhere else. Switzerland used to be popular for example for people from Stuttgart etc., but since the exchange rate dropped most of them also go to Austria, causing bad traffic jams near F├╝ssen and the Fernpass.

We even had some Ski Atlases that only featured Austria and South Tyrol, from ADAC some 10 years ago and from Freytag&Berndt; last year. But the Freytag&Berndt; one was really bad, not even the information which they got from the website was always correct and basically no differentiation at all whether a resort it suited for beginners/experts etc.

And that your brand of informed analysis is better is obvious, the only reason why in Germany they don’t do that probably is because that never has been done, at least not in the past 10-15 years (aside possibly from the Ski Guide Nordamerika by Christoph Schrahe - which only features North America).

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Posted: 14 July 2017 03:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Now the page is updated:

After 21 years and 20 editions, the editors and publishers, Dave and Chris, have decided on a radical change of direction. In September/October 2017, a new series of guides to individual countries will be launched with the publication of Where to Ski in Austria and Where to Ski in Italy. They will be available through this site. If you are on our mailing list you’ll be notified when they are available to order. (To join the list, click on Sign up for Newsletter, above.)
Next year, all being well, Where to Ski in France will be published, along with Where to Ski in Switzerland. And in 2019, Where to Ski in the USA and Canada. The current plan is that in 2020 Austria and Italy will appear in new, updated editons, and so on.

Seems to me like a good plan smile

Just one wish: Please do not forget the rest of the world, maybe as additional chapters, for example Slovenia and Germany to Austria, the Balkans to Italy, maybe Scandinavia to Switzerland and so on - these countries do not have many important resorts, but if those were missing completely it would be sad (or a special version which features also the Southern Hemisphere in depth). And please do not forget the Resort directory/index in the Country-specific books so that smaller areas (or certain, lesser known resorts in big areas) can be found.

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