1 of 2
1
Revamp the "Getting There" segments!
Posted: 05 July 2007 08:21 PM   [ Ignore ]
Newbie
Avatar
Rank
Total Posts:  19
Joined  2008-01-05

I think it would be most helpful to readers if more information on how to actually get to the resorts were included.  As it stands now, there’s hardly any useful information other than the nearest air/rail gateway to the resorts.  Additionally, there’s a lack of consistency with some resorts listing the transfer information and others completely left blank.
 
Perhaps information could presented in such a way as to give the reader a better understanding of what is involved with getting to a resort.  For example, let’s take a look at Vail, Colorado.
 
*as it stands now*
WTSS 2007:
Getting There
Air - Eagle 56km/35 miles (1 hr); Denver 193 km/120 miles (2 1/2 hr)
 
*if useful info were actually included*
Suggested format:
Air - Denver International Airport accessed by most major airlines.  Allow for 1 stop if flying internationally. Resort is 193 km/120 mi (2.5 hr) away via car rental on the well-maintained major motorway Interstate 70. 3 hours via shuttle bus service.
Eagle Airport - regional airport with connecting service from Denver. Seasonal service from US cities such as Chicago and Dallas. Resort is 56km/35 miles (1 hr) via car rental or shuttle bus service. 
 
I think the transfers segment of each resort chapter is deserving of much greater attention than what is currently offered and since many resorts are near each other the information will largely hold true from one ski area to the next requiring little change. 
 
Anthony

Profile
 
 
Posted: 06 July 2007 10:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  115
Joined  2008-01-05

No sorry Tony, I don’t agree. WTSS is generally read either by people who always buy a package (who don’t need the info you suggest) or by people who travel independently are already capable of extracting the info from other sources (as you have in the example you quote).
 
Better to rely on up-to-date contributions or blogs for this I think.
 
JJ

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 July 2007 10:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  371
Joined  2008-01-05

Er… we certainly don’t just appeal to "people who always buy a package".
 
In fact, I’d say we have far more readers going independently, in some form, these days - many operators now offer flexible choices too; so you might book your accommodation with them but make you own flight / car arrangements etc - a semi-package if you like!
 
WTSS is about choosing/knowing your destination whatever way you decide to travel there.
 
Agreed that the chapters are about the resorts themselves, but if you are using the book to help your choice of destination it’s often helpful to have an idea of transfers, location etc to back that up. EG. family travellers might want to check a resort isn’t too far for them to drive or off-the-beaten-track from a certain airport etc.

Actually, I’d pitch this discussion somewhere in between both your views: I think that we should offer something better in terms of "Getting There" info - readers shouldn’t have to use "other sources"; but we cannot expand it so fully as to eliminate more important resort facts.
 
What do others think? Would you like to see more on "Getting There" in the book? I think that we should expand this on the website too - with firm links to the book. The site may give more opportunity for expansion which page size, chapter size, cannot.
 
W
 

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 July 2007 02:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  115
Joined  2008-01-05

Agreed not ONLY them although I know enough people who buy it every year and ski on a package every year.
 
I think the website would be the ideal place for this information. Then everyone can help to keep it updated (during the season when it is most useful) and let us all know how well the local transport link actually works.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 July 2007 08:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Newbie
Avatar
Rank
Total Posts:  19
Joined  2008-01-05

John, please note that the COVER of the book clearly states that it’s "The definitive guide…critical, comprehensive, detailed".  I think the key words there are definitive and comprehensive.  Meaning it’s not just geared for someone taking a quick mini-break from London because they got a last minute deal online but also for someone like myself who is traveling 5,000+ miles and needs to know what I’m in for when I step off the plane. 
 
I am not suggesting that Chris & Co. write detailed travel itineraries but at least some sort of useful information when it comes to the ground transfer side of things should be included. 

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 July 2007 10:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  115
Joined  2008-01-05

Yes fair enough - although someone taking a mini-break probably would need more information. Anyhow, I think Wendy’s idea is more sensible than mine!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 July 2007 10:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  371
Joined  2008-01-05

Thanks John! I’ll have to get the Ed’s to chip in with their views as soon as the new edition of the book is off to the printers…
 
Shall we get on and plan the next one then ../graphics/emot1.gif
 
There probably isn’t enough space to expand the travel info in the resort chapters as fully as you would like Anthony, but I do agree it is a bit ‘weak’ in its present form. Some sort of general resort table might work.
 
I think the rail info could be better -lots of folk are using trains to transfer to resorts. And there are several specialist bus services now (for example: the Graubunden Express from Zurich to Davos), which ought to be included - separate from the main bulk of the text. Maybe an expanded directory entry, with resorts served etc..referring to a more detailed section on the website?
 
W
 

 

 

 

 

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 July 2007 02:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  1
Joined  2008-01-05

I think another thing missing is, when reasonable flights/non-stop routes start. I went to Breckenridge mid December last year and the flight cost £360 return to Denver and I had to make 1 stop. But if I had gone in January, for the same price, I could have flown without any stops.
 
This is important info, because the slopes were open from early November, and apart from Thanks giving and Xmas the accomidation was fairly cheap during that time. People need to have all the information to be able to plan around time and money.
 
Additionally, what would be helpful (if possible) would be to list some of the more reasonably prices airlines, serving a location.
 
The 2007 copy is the first i have brought, and these are just some of the things i felt would have improved holiday planning. I thought everything else was spot on.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 02 August 2007 05:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  371
Joined  2008-01-05

Good point Steptee.
 
Have you read our chapters on flying / rail travel to the Alps? We list quite a few of the airlines and related info there. These are updated for each edition of the book.
 
Agreed though: we need to cover some of the North American routes too, and the seasonal differences you point out could be mentioned as well.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 August 2007 06:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  3
Joined  2008-01-05

School holiday dates would be a big plus too, both for cheap flights and as a general "When to go" for each country?
 
It’s not always easy to find this info online, and as the guide is seasonal, it would be accurate..

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 April 2008 10:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Member
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  55
Joined  2008-01-05

It’s time we were sitting down to consider how to respond to these ideas in the new edition - so if there are any more views on the travel angle of our resort chapters, speak now ...
 
Chris

Profile
 
 
Posted: 23 April 2008 02:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  382
Joined  2008-01-05

In most respects I think this is aimed at the independent traveller. So let us break down the travel arrangements:
 
Drive:
 
I think the current book deals with this very well.
 
Train:
 
The snow train options offered by rail Europe and the snow train are well covered, but further sections could be added on the use of SNCF etc and making your own arrangements. For example how many readers know that Flaine is well served by train?
 
Fly:
 
The difficult one, travel portals such as Opodo and airmiles cover a lot of options but do not include some airlines that offer cheep flights. Of course the flights that are available today may not be offered when the book comes to print and (probably to the author?s annoyance) the 3 or 4 year old ones we have on our bookshelves. There are multitude of routes available, some obvious, some not so obvious and few that will be at the convenient date and time. There appears no alternative but to spend at lot of time surfing the web and asking other people for advice. IMHO all you can do is publish a map showing the destination airports and the ski resorts they serve. A similar map could show airports in the UK that offer flights to the ski resort airports, after all unless you live in Derby or Nottingham, would East Midlands Airport spring to mind, but it is near the M1 and M42 and nearly in the centre of the country. A list of the websites of all possible airlines would be essential. Keeping this up-to-date will be an excellent use of your website as well as a continuous thread of people asking for and giving advice, perhaps along the lines of ?ask a fellow traveller?
 
Mixed Mode:
 
I did once cost out the prospects of getting a flight to Paris, then transferring to the train, that way avoiding the hassle, cost and time of going via London. Many visitors to the Swiss resorts get the plane to Geneva and transfer to the resort by train.
 
Transfers:
 
The hard bit of organising your own trip is the transfers. A lot of searching on the internet will throw up Satobus and the like, but there are others. The reader may be a little nervous about organising a train trip to Val d?Isere if they did not know you could just walk out of the railway station and get a bus. Many take car hire because at first glance it is the only way, but there are other options, sometimes less expensive and the costs are not always clear since some resorts charge for car parking, whereas others do not. I think a whole section with clear contact details on arranging transfers, sample costs and times would be very useful.
 
Some things experience has taught me include: Grenoble airport is not near Grenoble and its public transport systems; to get a train transfer from Lyon airport do not use the fancy airport railway station, but get the bus to Lyon Dieu; trains to Bourg st Maurice are not very frequent; do not take a cheep flight to Turin and think the transfer to Les Arcs is short (as indicated by http://www.mappy.fr). And, one for my nephew, Geneva and Grenoble may both begin with the same letter but they are in fact different airports miles apart!
 
John

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 April 2008 06:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
Member
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  55
Joined  2008-01-05

Thanks John - lots of food for thought there!
 
Chris

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 April 2008 05:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  115
Joined  2008-01-05

I think that one of the items that might be worth including is some information about ticketing.
 
Bought in advance, rail tckets can be very cheap - especially in Germany and Austria. In January, we travelled from Munich to Schladming 1st class for only £45 return each. We booked in November and the journey was delightful. Lots of Austrian resorts are directly accessible by rail.
 
The luggage transfer in Switzerland is brilliant. No need to think about it between the airport and your destination station (and in most cases) your hotel room! Tickets cost more but the trsins are really comfortable and scarily efficient.
 
John is right about France too. Rail access to the Tarentaise is excellent but hardly ever considered outside France.
 
Finally, don’t forget Italy. You can get the train to within striking distance of most resports in the Aosta Valley or over in the Dolomites. For the latter Bolzano makes a very handy gateway which is easily accessed from Verona or Innsbruck.
 
John

Profile
 
 
Posted: 23 May 2008 11:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  382
Joined  2008-01-05

The various transport methods do not necessarily run for the whole of the ski season. I noticed, for example, when trying to go out to Les Arcs at the end of the season that a number airlines had switched their fleets to summer routes a few weeks earlier. Many do this at Easter.
 
Additionally, last year, the snow trains did not operate before Christmas.
 
I suspect that skiers experienced and desperate enough to go at these times will be very aware of the transport options available.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 June 2015 09:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  5
Joined  2013-04-21

I think it would be very helpful if more information was provided regarding transfers from airport to resort. Perhaps not under each resort chapter but maybe a chapter at the beginning of the book which recommends some reliable transfer companies to use from budget to luxury and gives a bit more information regarding rail links. It’s a bit of a minefield trying to find decent value and reliable transfers, especially in France, so I’m sure any extra information on this would greatly help people planning a D.I.Y trip to the snow.

Chris

Profile
 
 
   
1 of 2
1