Major resorts in Italy

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Sestriere

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Sestriere was built for snow – high, with north-west-facing slopes; sadly, the snow on these slopes often has a large artificial component. The real drawback, though, is that the village is a difficult…

Abetone

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A unique combination: Tuscan culture and history combined with snow and winter sports. The resort has a long racing tradition too

Alagna

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Alagna is a peaceful farming village on the far eastern fringes of the Monterosa ski area. The old wooden buildings and quiet streets make it feel distinctly different from the conventional ski resort.…

Arabba

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Arabba is a small, quiet village diagonally opposite Selva on the Sella Ronda circuit, with steep, shady local slopes – some of the most challenging terrain in the region. Off the circuit, the Marmolada…

Bardonecchia

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Bustling market-town in a pleasant valley near Turin, with uncrowded cruising on two separate areas

Bormio

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One on its own, this: a tall, narrow mountain above a very unusual, historic town – a spa as well as a ski resort

Canazei

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Canazei is a sizeable town in Trentino’s Val di Fassa – a fabulously scenic region that is rather neglected by the British. The cobbled streets, modern hotels and traditional-style buildings are attractively…

Cervinia

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If there is a better resort than Cervinia for those who like easy cruising in spring sunshine, we have yet to find it. And then there’s more easy cruising on the gentlest of Zermatt’s slopes just over…

Champoluc

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Champoluc is popular with Italian weekenders from Milan and Turin, but is hardly heard of on the international market. As a result, it retains a friendly, small-scale, unspoiled Italian ambience. The village…

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